Day 1

08:15 AM

CHAIRPERSON’S OPENING REMARKS: NAVIGATING HEALTHCARE MESSAGING

Despite our daily experience with text messaging and consumer messaging apps, messaging applied to healthcare is much different. This presentation will set the stage for the conference by defining the healthcare messaging market, and attendees will learn how messaging differs from traditional HIT software like EMRs, PACS or data analytics. Attendees will also learn what buyers need to know to select the right messaging system and avoid 5 key pitfalls when buying messaging systems. Finally, the presentation will close with a look at why messaging systems will become a major new class of enterprise software, on par with the EMR.
Tim Gee, Principal, Medical Connectivity Consulting

09:00 AM

DESIGNING A MOBILE COMMUNICATION STRATEGY FOR CLINICIANS

Healthcare environments are dynamic with multidisciplinary care teams across locations using various clinical systems and a choice of communication devices. The key to easily connect these team members with the right person or information instantly depends on the right communication platform, which provides interoperability between clinical systems and clinician mobility via hands-free communication, secure text messaging and alerting. While many hospitals may identify and implement the right communication solution, transformational improvements can’t occur unless there is significant clinician adoption. This presentation will offer best practices for deploying mobile healthcare technologies that streamline workflows and improve care team communication and collaboration enterprise-wide. It will also show how strong clinician adoption of the right communication technology can transform patient care, safety and experience.
David Augsburger MSN, MBA, RN, CCRN, Director of Clinical Informatics, Major Health Partners

09:40 AM

MESSAGING WITHIN CHAOS – A PHYSICIAN PERSPECTIVE

The goals in advancing technology in healthcare should include enhanced patient safety, improved operational efficiencies, and reduced overall costs to the system. Design of new technology often fails to appropriately understand the environment experienced by physicians, ultimately leading to poor adoption. Further, complex systems tailored toward a specific setting may be cumbersome in different locations or among diverse medical specialties. Successful technology initiatives require an understanding of the physician practice environment and a focus on simplicity. This session will examine physician practice settings and review a case study of successful messaging of critical diagnostics at a hospital in Southern Vermont.
Trey Dobson, MD, Chief Medical Officer and Emergency Physician, Southwestern Vermont Medical Center, Dartmouth – Hitchcock Health

10:50 AM

HOW TO IMPROVE UNIT COMMUNICATION, REDUCE NOISE AND INCREASE NURSE AND PATIENT SATISFACTION IN JUST 60 DAYS

When management at Mission Health identified information gaps as an ongoing barrier to better patient care, streamlined workflows and nurse satisfaction, Wolfgram undertook a major clinical mobile device and application pilot for Mission’s largest hospital in Asheville, North Carolina. He worked with Ascom to implement a combination of Ascom Myco® smart phones paired with Unite Context software to enable secure voice calls and text messaging to support clinical team communication and tele-tech workflows with their Health Unit Coordinator (HUC). Wolfgram will present new case study findings, including key data, clinician and patient care impacts, and lessons learned.
Joseph Wolfgram, Chief Technology Officer, Mission Health

11:30 AM

EMBRACING A SYSTEM OF ACTION: THE BUSINESS CASE FOR CLINICAL COMMUNICATION

Today, the digital footprint of the patient is well established with EHR’s largely deployed in both an ambulatory and acute care environment. Combined with clinical systems of record such as PACS, LIS and others, we now have the technology to enable care teams to truly put the patient at the center of care. Dr. Michael Docktor Pediatric Gastroenterologist, Clinical Director of Innovation, and Director of Clinical Mobile Solutions at Boston Children’s Hospital and Brad Brooks, Co-Founder and CEO at TigerText discuss the business value of modern clinical communication tools and their impact on an organization’s bottom line. Learn how moving from a System of Record to a System of Action will improve outcomes, reduce errors, and increase patient satisfaction.
Michael Docktor, MD, Pediatric Gastroenterologist, Clinical Director of Innovation & Director of Clinical Mobile Solutions, Boston Children’s Hospital
Brad Brooks, Co-Founder & CEO, TigerText

12:10 PM

Sponsor / Exhibitor Showcase & Luncheon

 

Choose Sessions from Track A or Track B

Day 1 Track A

01:20 PM

INTEGRATION OF MOBILE MESSAGING AND PHYSIOLOGIC ALARMS: CHALLENGES AND BENEFITS

Unexpected physiologic changes can occur at any time, and on any patient in the acute care setting. Furthermore, these changes often represent early stages of life-threatening deterioration, many of which occur in non-ICU settings where nurse to patient ratios do not allow for direct patient observation. Distributing clinically actionable alarms through messaging systems to assigned care givers provides an immediate and directed response to the deteriorating patient. The challenge is how to filter and direct actionable alarms to assigned care givers within their existing work flow. End-users prefer a single mobile device that provides work-flow messages, medical device alarms and integration with the Electronic Health Record. However, physiologic monitors can generate hundreds of alarms per patient per day resulting in alarm fatigue and often technology abandonment. Alarm configuration, filtering and management can reduce the number of alarms so that only actionable events are distributed to the messaging system. Successful integration coupled with clinical practice development holds great potential in reducing adverse events, avoiding escalation of care and thereby reducing cost. This presentation will address the technical, regulatory, management and human factors issues surrounding the integration of medical device alarms with messaging systems.
James Welch, CCE, Founder & President, ARC BIOMEDICAL

01:55 PM

HEALTHCARE MESSAGING – TAMING THE MONSTER

Over the last 30 years, communication mobility has become a mission critical element of healthcare operations that touches every part of the healthcare provider spectrum. Pagers, in-building telephone systems, smartphones and the like have revolutionized hospital workflow and communications, but not always with the intended results. In spite of the critical connectivity provided by these platforms within the extended organization, they produce an endless stream of controlled and uncontrolled interruptions that often keep nurses and clinical/operational staff from optimally providing care, potentially putting patients in danger. While the first phase of the communications evolution has been mostly about connectivity, finding ways to quiet the cacophony of messaging across uncoordinated or related platforms, without reducing their effectiveness, is the necessary next wave. With comprehensive data in hand, messaging analytics can provide key guidance to health systems as they look to find the sweet spot in which the right people get the right messages at the right time for the right reasons. In this session, we will explore 1) Research on distractions and their impact on productivity in healthcare 2) Current best practices for reducing notification fatigue 3) Case studies of two hospitals utilizing actual notification activity metrics.
Kenny Schiff, Founder & Managing Partner, CareSight.com

02:30 PM

MESSAGING WITHOUT BORDERS – NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR CARE REDESIGN

Collaboration and communication are at the core of patient-centered care. And while the electronic health record has improved our ability to capture data, the evidence points to a mixed view of its effects on team-based care coordination.
Narath Carlile, MD, MPH, Chief Medical Information Officer, ACT.md

03:35 PM

HOW THE HEALTHCARE MESSAGING MARKET IS EVOLVING

Jack has observed the health care messaging market first hand, since 2009. Over that time, much has changed. This presentation will delve into current and near-term use cases supported by messaging platforms, and the various players — specialized messaging solution vendors and HIT software vendors who include messaging “add-ons” to their traditional software. Jack will explore the considerations for buying “best of breed applications” versus having a broad collaboration suite from a single vendor and augmenting as needed.
Jack Mark, Entrepreneur & Founder, Mobile Heartbeat

04:10 PM

WHY TEXT MESSAGES SATISFY PATIENTS: SURVEY REVEALS INTER- GENERATIONAL COMMUNICATION LESSONS

Physicians can no longer rely solely on care excellence to ensure patient satisfaction and retention. According to a recent research study, strong patient relationships start with practice logistics — including text messaging capabilities. The Patient-Provider Relationship Study was designed to better understand patients’ satisfaction and communication preferences, as well as why they change physicians. It shows that as many as one in three patients will switch providers in the next few years because of dissatisfaction with factors such as wait times, communication and appointment scheduling. What patients want is more time with doctors, greater connectivity, online tools and convenience via text. In fact, 79% desire text messages from their doctors; 73% want to send texts to them. After attending this presentation, attendees will be able to:
  • Explain why patients of all generations — millennials, generation X and baby boomers — prefer text messages to communicate with providers.
  • Identify how to use text messages to improve collaboration and the patient experience.
  • Describe key generational differences and similarities around patient satisfaction and loyalty.
As healthcare becomes more consumer-oriented, providers must re-think the patient-provider relationship and the role text messages can play in keeping patients satisfied.
Josh Weiner, Chief Operating Officer, Solutionreach

04:45 PM

THE VALUE HIERARCHY FOR A CLINICAL COMMUNICATIONS & COLLABORATION PLATFORM

In this session, we will explore the benefits of smoother clinical workflows, greater communication efficiencies and improving patient outcomes with your clinical communications and collaboration platform. Driving adoption of this technology can be a challenge so we will present best practices and data from our customers who have successfully achieved true enterprise adoption. You will discover new ways to enhance existing workflows and develop new workflows you may not have known existed, ultimately leading to efficiencies and better patient outcomes.
Mike Detjen, Chief Strategy Officer, Mobile Heartbeat

05:20 PM

DON’T STRESS. SMILE. Secure Messaging Implemented with Less Effort

We are no longer debating the ancient question of whether healthcare organizations require secure messaging. That was answered two decades ago when the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 mandated it. Now The biggest question for healthcare professionals today is “How do I deliver a Secure Messaging project and ensure its adoption?” There are many challenges both internally and externally which can derail your initiative. This presentation focuses on how a large hospital in Providence RI successfully delivered an enterprise wide secure messaging platform with less effort and minimal pushback as compared with other projects within their portfolio. Attendees can expect to learn:
  1. The challenges which will definitely surface before, during and after a secure messaging project and how to plan for them
  2. A proven framework for a successful HIPAA compliant messaging implementation
  3. How to drive user adoption and foster cross functional team collaboration
  4. The metrics by which you can measure your success
Bill Van Loon, Director of Enterprise Sales, OnPage
Day 1 Track B

01:20 PM

LESSONS LEARNED FROM 100 IMPLEMENTATIONS

Dr. Jose Barreau gives tips on successfully implementing an enterprise-wide clinical communication platform for your healthcare system. Determining the best project leadership teams, defining the scope, understanding workflows, training the right people, ensuring high adoption rates, and outlining best practices including BYOD policies all contribute to the outcome of an implementation. Join Dr. Barreau to learn how to best align resources so doctors, nurses and clinicians can streamline communications successfully.
Jose Barreau, MD, CEO & Co-Founder, Doc Halo

01:55 PM

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY VS. INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL: HOW TO RECOGNIZE, CAPTURE, AND PROTECT YOUR ORGANIZATION’S KNOW-HOW, WORKFLOW, TECHNOLOGY, AND INNOVATION TO IMPROVE PRODUCTIVITY, SAFETY, AND SATISFACTION

Every organization must have a strategy around creating value through both intellectual property and intellectual capital. Increasing the value of your organization through proper alignment of resources to capture everything from “know-how" to “workflow" to technology protectable via patents is the ultimate goal. But, the more elusive "intellectual capital" is difficult to recognize and quantify, and “intellectual property” is often difficult and expensive to protect. While it is attractive to only consider patents, copyrights, and trademarks because they are tangible, the intangible items may prove to be more valuable long term—intellectual capital can have as much intrinsic value to your organization as patentable technology. This presentation will identify the differences between intellectual property and intellectual capital and discuss best practices and provide suggestions for quantifying and protecting both, including:
  • Identifying valuable workflows and how to maintain as proprietary to your organization
  • Measuring workflow efficacy, including whether an implemented workflow is actually driving productivity and satisfaction
  • Avoiding conflicts with vendors whose products may be used to automate your workflows
  • Leveraging your organization’s “best practices” with your vendor partners and other collaborators.
Jennifer Bailey, Shareholder, Erise IP
Kourtney Govro, CEO & Founder, Sphere3

02:30 PM

HOW TO USE MACHINE LEARNING IN HEALTHCARE CHATBOTS AND MESSAGING SYSTEMS TO INCREASE STAFF PRODUCTIVITY AND IMPROVE PATIENT SATISFACTION

The ultimate goals of healthcare messaging systems should be to increase patient education, answer questions in a timely manner, improve patient outcomes, reduce patients’ administrative burdens, and increase staff productivity by allowing staff to focus on communicating with the neediest patients. The unintended results of many healthcare messaging systems have, unfortunately, been to accidentally increase staff workloads and reduce productivity for some because patients often chat more with staff willing to message with them. The good news is that there are machine learning (ML) techniques available to allow machine responses with auto-triage and auto-escalation and simulate human responses so that some or many patient and staff communiques can be answered via chatbots and passing some or many messages to humans only when necessary. Join Shahid Shah, who’s built many healthcare chatbots and messaging systems, lead an interactive session on what works and what doesn’t.
Shahid Shah, Publisher, Netspective Media

03:35 PM

IMPROVING THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE THROUGH MESSAGING & ANALYTICS

Over the last 6-years Northern Westchester Hospital (NWH) has worked to bring together communications technology, operational optimization, education, and analytics to create an environment of continuous improvement. Starting with a housewide expansion of Vocera in 2011, bolstered by the introduction of Connexall/Rauland nurse call integration in 2012, and reinforced by the updating of the Rauland nursecall platform, NWH has been working on many fronts to improve the patient experience. But even with a significant investment, it has been hard to understand impact and effectiveness. As Director of Telecommunications, George Weldon and his small team are in the middle of a demanding organization, from both a technology and support standpoint. The communication technologies they manage are the an important conduit of critical details regarding the patient experience and hospital operations. Bolstered by ongoing analysis of inflows and outflows, George’s leadership is educating management about current state and supporting the organization as they explore improvements. In this session, George will share 1) How analytics around messaging and alarms are being correlated with patient experience data to mold strategy and operations 2) the challenges faced by Telecommunications managers as they try to support organizational improvement 3) Do’s and Don’ts for utilizing messaging analytics.
George Weldon, Jr. LMHC, NCC, Director of Telecommunications, Northern Westchester Hospital

04:10 PM

CONNECTIVITY, NOTIFICATION AND THE CORE OF COLLABORATION

There is power in connectivity. With the capacity to heighten visibility to critical needs, drive appropriate response, and increase satisfaction, event notification is at the core of delivering desired outcomes and influencing the way healthcare is delivered.
Rikki Jennings, BSN, RN, CPN, Clinical Workflow Manager, Connexall USA

04:45 PM

OPTIMIZING AND STREAMLINING WORKFLOWS ACROSS YOUR HOSPITAL

Communications around patient care, such as lab and radiology results, pain assessments, patient dietary needs orders, and even code alerts, can involve numerous steps, multiple people and repeated phone calls and alerts. There are often delays in message delivery and acknowledgments, as the process is inefficient and unreliable. This session will look at how integrated secure messaging technology can be used to optimize the various communication workflows across a healthcare facility, improve team collaboration, and implement best practices for cross-facility communications. As a result, hospitals can dramatically reduce response times and increase staff productivity, ultimately improving patient care, safety and satisfaction. Charles Still, Application Architect, Interbit Data
Day 2

08:15 AM

CHAIRPERSON’S OPENING REMARKS

Tim Gee, Principal, Medical Connectivity Consulting
Day 2 Track A

08:30 AM

PROVIDER-INNOVATOR CO-COMMERCIALIZATION DELIVERING RESULTS IN MENTAL HEALTH

SOFIA (Simple Online Family Intervention for ADHD) system is a co-commercialized initiative between MEMOTEXT Corporation, Mass General Hospital (MGH) and Partners Healthcare led by Dr. Joseph Biederman Chief, Clinical and Research Programs in Pediatric Psychopharmacology and Adult ADHD. The team has created a web and SMS based program that helps address the taxing issue of medication adherence, support and education in children with attention deficit /hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The collaboration advances work for patients and families with an evidence-based program developed by Dr. Biederman and his team at MGH. MEMOTEXT brings a dynamic digital model for interactive communications using adaptive logic to deploy dynamic/self-learning notifications to parents of children with ADHD about their child’s medication and treatment. Parents are encouraged to respond to messages to provide more information, which helps customize their personal experience further and make the program better by addressing specific needs. The SOFIA team will discuss co-commercialization and of working together to broaden the availability of the intervention for other stakeholders like pharmaceutical manufacturers, insurers and health systems. Studies have shown that at least 30% of families of children with ADHD do not renew their first prescription with the attendant adverse impact in quality of life, health economics and outcomes.
Amos Adler, MSc, President, MEMOTEXT
Joseph Biederman, MD, Chief, Clinical and Research Programs in Pediatric Psychopharmacology and Adult ADHD, Massachusetts General Hospital

09:05 AM

CLINICAL COMMUNICATION DECONSTRUCTED: A FRAMEWORK FOR SUCCESSFUL, HUMAN-CENTERED HEALTHCARE COMMUNICATION

Communication is as a key driver of teamwork. In healthcare, patient and family engagement sits at the core of a humanized, ideal experience. It drives quality, safety, satisfaction, outcomes, and financial results. But what is effective clinical communication, and how can system and frontline leaders optimize it? This presentation will analyze seven key components of clinical communication, helping attendees identify and diagnose breakdowns in communication. The presenter will also propose a human-centered framework backed by proven best practices for successful patient engagement and clinical communication.
Liz Boehm, Director of Research, Experience Innovation Network

09:40 AM

SIMPLIFYING CLINICAL WORKFLOWS WITH A SINGLE COMMUNICATION AND COLLABORATION PLATFORM

Communication systems in healthcare have paradoxically become more complex, with an increase in upside potential and downside risk, even as the power and flexibility of mobile computing has grown. In the era of the Internet of Medical Things, a robust Clinical Communication and Collaboration (CC&C) platform has become a requirement, enabling clinically meaningful interoperability, while simultaneously permitting administrative simplification. The right CC&C solution is device agnostic and unifies all modes of communication (both voice and text) on the same platform, upon which alarm management and on-call/staff scheduling is layered. In this session, learn how healthcare CIOs and CMIOs are using a single CC&C platform to improve communication, reduce interruption fatigue, and increase patient care, safety and satisfaction, while elevating staff experience and well-being.
Benjamin Kanter, MD, FCCP, Chief Medical Information Officer, Vocera

10:45 AM

FROM INDIVIDUAL CARE TO MACHINE LEARNING: THE POWER OF PATIENT-PROVIDER MESSAGING

Patients love being able to message with their providers, and messaging between in-clinic visits can improve adherence and outcomes. However, many providers are concerned about the extra time that may be associated with patient messaging. In this session we’ll explore best practices for managing remote patients and keeping them adherent to an interactive treatment plan based on the experiences of Tamara DeAngelis from Boston University Center for Neurorehabilitation in managing a group of people with Parkinson disease during a randomized control trial. Tamara will share tips and tricks for motivating patients. We will also examine some of the costs of messaging with patients, and explore insights from machine learning classification applied to over 80,000 patient messages to providers, and discuss how artificial intelligence when combined with caregiver interactions can be used to scale care. The session will debunk common myths about patient messaging, and show a way forward with both technology and a human touch.
Tamara DeAngelis, PT, DPT, GCS, Boston University Center for Rehabilitation
Anne Weiler, CEO, Wellpepper

11:20 AM

TOP 5 PITFALLS TO AVOID WHEN IMPLEMENTING A CLINICAL COMMUNICATION PLATFORM

Clinical communication and collaboration seems like it should be easy with technology today, but it continues to be one of the biggest challenges facing health systems. Much of the problem lies with user education and understanding the best use of communication tools in a clinical setting, without adding to the already high clinician interruption fatigue. Bob uses the experience he’s gained in clinical communications to highlight five key challenges and how to address them.  Join him to learn:
  • Social media versus professional mission critical messaging
  • The difference between alerts and alarms and the notion of “Alarm Fatigue”
  • What real-time communication means in terms of accuracy and timeliness
  • Determining the correct volume of information at ones fingertips
  • Cognitive load and ways to help manage it
Bob Porterfield, Vice President of Product Integrations, Doc Halo

11:55 AM

PLENARY PANEL DISCUSSION: MESSAGING SYSTEM INTEROPERABILITY: IS PLUG-N-PLAY INTEROPERABILITY POSSIBLE? IS IT NEEDED?

Healthcare messaging is both a feature-rich enterprise application and a use case that can compliment traditional HIT software such as EMRs and various workflow automation solutions. As traditional HIT software adopts messaging as a feature, and enterprise messaging solutions embrace a wider number of use cases, providers will start to struggle with the unintended proliferation of messaging apps on mobile devices and numerous integrations between enterprise software and a growing number of messaging apps. The proliferation of messaging platforms will increase the cost and reduce the effectiveness of the messaging solutions deployed. A way to mitigate this uncontrolled proliferation is interoperability across messaging platforms. This panel will discuss the potential benefits of interoperability, and the technical and business opportunities and barriers to achieving interoperability in an industry that has long preferred proprietary end-to-end solutions.

Moderator:
Tim Gee, Principal, Medical Connectivity Consulting 
Panelists:
Angus Douglas, Chief Mobility Architect, Life Care Solutions, GE Healthcare
Jack Mark, Entrepreneur & Founder, Mobile Heartbeat
Shahid Shah, CEO, Netspective Communications
Anne Weiler, CEO, Wellpepper
Day 2 Track B

08:30 AM

ARE CONSUMER GRADE SMARTPHONES GOOD ENOUGH FOR THE ENTERPRISE?

The introduction of new smart phones and touch screen tablets have created a lot of interest and traction in healthcare. Healthcare organizations are often attracted to these devices because of the user experience and relatively low cost of the devices themselves. However; the initial cost of the device does not equal the total cost of ownership.
In this presentation you will learn:
  •  The key device requirements for point of care environments and their associated standards.
  • The differences in networking and data security features between consumer and enterprise grade point of care devices.
  • The device management and power requirements for point of care devices and how consumer and enterprise grade devices compare.
This presentation will focus in on the value proposition of the “right” mobile device for voice and mobility integration into the healthcare environment.
David Hoglund, Founder & CEO, Integra Systems, Inc.

09:05 AM

SMARTPHONES IN HEALTHCARE – BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN TECHNICAL AND CLINICAL

Healthcare is an inherently mobile business. Nurses, physicians, and technicians all require full access to EMRs and other critical information. As such, smartphones are now a necessity of care. Delays in patient care often result from clinicians wasting time tracking down patient information or feedback from other care team members. In this workshop, we’ll explore how clinical mobile devices help to improve communication among care team members, accelerate patient response times, and provide a more personal connection between clinicians and their patients. There are three primary business drivers that are ubiquitous across healthcare:
  • Improving patient outcomes
  • Reducing costs
  • Improving access to care
Can smartphones help? When deployed correctly, smartphones provide clinicians with the right information at the time they need it in a format that meets their needs. Through 25 years of mobility experience, Spectralink will demonstrate how to help clinicians cost effectively complete routine tasks more efficiently such as receiving applicable alarms, messages, and critical test results. This allows them to spend more with their patients, improve critical decision making, and create a more positive patient experience.
Bill Foster, Director of Healthcare Business Development, Spectralink

10:45 AM

THINKING BEYOND THE SMARTPHONE – THE CASE FOR A PURPOSE-BUILT DEVICE FOR HEALTHCARE.

Many hospitals have struggled to adopt smartphones into their mobility strategies. Whether they’ve opted for work-issued devices or BYOD, early adopters have realized that "consumer" smartphones just don’t live up to the demands of healthcare environments. Adding hardware accessories and custom apps in attempts to make them more "professional" can be counterproductive. Managing multiple apps from multiple vendors can become very complex for IT, and an endless source of distraction for end-users. Total Cost of Ownership can go up significantly. Today's healthcare ICT strategies must go beyond consumer smartphone trends to address the growing communication needs of modern caregivers. Well-defined strategies must simultaneously provide staff with reliable mobile communication that facilitates effective collaboration and also grants instant access to the information they need to take the best decisions and actions. Discover what it takes to build a robust platform and eco-system that actively support a smart device that's purpose-built for healthcare.
Mwila Kapema, Mobility Product Manager, Ascom North America

11:20 AM

EXPLORE THE BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES OF UNIFYING A FRACTURED COMMUNICATION INFRASTRUCTURE UNDER ONE UMBRELLA

In most hospitals disparate systems send alerts and notifications in one form or another to any number of different device types.  Alerts can come from anything including legacy software, EMR systems, nurse call, critical results, scheduling software, PBX systems, building management, IT monitoring and more.  These systems typically deliver alerts only through defined channels based on supported protocols for data exchange to email, pagers, SMS text, IP phones, or a smartphone app.  Is it any wonder there is alarm fatigue in almost every hospital with these isolated alerting mechanisms?

Learn the steps for unifying your total communication infrastructure for both automatic and manual alerts, going to any supported device from one platform that reconciles your notification network.  Once the network is under a single umbrella see what can be done by optimizing for targeting, reliability, speed, and accountability without making drastic changes.  Once everything is working optimally you’ll be in a position to choose your path of evolution department by department.
Pamela LaPine, CEO, HipLink Software

11:55 AM

PLENARY PANEL DISCUSSION: MESSAGING SYSTEM INTEROPERABILITY: IS PLUG-N-PLAY INTEROPERABILITY POSSIBLE? IS IT NEEDED?

Healthcare messaging is both a feature-rich enterprise application and a use case that can compliment traditional HIT software such as EMRs and various workflow automation solutions. As traditional HIT software adopts messaging as a feature, and enterprise messaging solutions embrace a wider number of use cases, providers will start to struggle with the unintended proliferation of messaging apps on mobile devices and numerous integrations between enterprise software and a growing number of messaging apps. The proliferation of messaging platforms will increase the cost and reduce the effectiveness of the messaging solutions deployed. A way to mitigate this uncontrolled proliferation is interoperability across messaging platforms. This panel will discuss the potential benefits of interoperability, and the technical and business opportunities and barriers to achieving interoperability in an industry that has long preferred proprietary end-to-end solutions.

Moderator:
Tim Gee, Principal, Medical Connectivity Consulting 
Panelists:
Angus Douglas, Chief Mobility Architect, Life Care Solutions, GE Healthcare
Jack Mark, Entrepreneur & Founder, Mobile Heartbeat
Shahid Shah, CEO, Netspective Communications
Anne Weiler, CEO, Wellpepper