Day 1

08:15 AM

CHAIRPERSON’S OPENING REMARKS & KEYNOTE ADDRESS: INTRODUCTION TO BLOCKCHAIN IN HEALTHCARE

The opening keynote will begin by asking the question of why a Healthcare Blockchain Summit now? Moving beyond the usual discussion of hype and anti-hype, what are the pragmatic concerns that are driving more interest in blockchain over the past year and how can decision-makers begin to engage with the technology in light of current health IT needs? As blockchain itself evolves, the challenge of “skating to the puck” becomes even more challenging. One of the keys to success in the rapidly evolving blockchain landscape, in the context of a very complex health IT landscape littered with political uncertainty, is to think strategically about “cooperation” with other partners and across divisions within companies. Healthcare is a wicked problem demanding innovative approaches to cooperation and new technologies such as blockchain can benefit from utilizing strategic cooperation as a tool. The successful platform strategies we see in other sectors of the economy have figured this out and we will likely see the future of healthcare influenced by both platform economics and innovative uses of blockchain. Given the maturity level of blockchain and the complexity of healthcare, blockchain advocates themselves are already seeing the value of cooperation in driving adoption and interest, developing conversations on standards and a host of other areas that we will hear discussed throughout the summit. This keynote will explore opportunities for building an innovative cooperative ecosystem that can drive more effective appropriation of blockchain in the health sector globally.
Jody Ranck, DrPH, CEO, Krysalis Labs & Executive Vice President of Strategy, Ram Group 

08:45 AM

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: BLOCKCHAINS IN HEALTHCARE: TRANSFORMING STRATEGY AND BUSINESS MODELS?

The digital age is turning traditional business strategy inside out.  Two of the guideposts of the past fifty years lie in the dustbins of history: 1) the BCG experience curve explaining economies of scale and, 2) Porter’s 5 Forces Model describing value chains and competitive strategies. This session will describe and discuss the potential for blockchains to create new business models and strategy. Topics that will be covered include:
  • Blockchains as platforms
  • Network effects
  • Understanding transaction costs
  • How blockchains can decentralize or recentralize power structures
  • How both disruptors and incumbents can use blockchains
  • Case study: companies and initiatives using blockchains with health records/data
Vince Kuraitis JD, MBA, Principal, Better Health Technologies, LLC

09:15 AM

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: BLOCKCHAIN IN HEALTHCARE: WHY SO MUCH HYPE AND SO LITTLE IMPLEMENTATION?

Blockchain represents a solution set with several key integrated capabilities.  Numerous effective applications exist in the financial sector.  Many startups are building healthcare solutions with blockchain components, but none have reached widespread adoption.  Because of the integrated set of services provided by a blockchain platform, many stakeholders often need to participate in the adoption of blockchain-based applications within a pre-existing multi-platform ecosystem, aka Plecosystem. Planning and executing blockchain solutions must include strategy for how to define and elicit  the commitment of a critical mass of participants.  One way of expressing this dilemma is that there is a "high activation energy for a minimum viable ecosystem".  Understanding those challenges and finding solutions that provide a clear ROI will ultimately lead to several pervasive blockchain applications in healthcare.  This talk will highlight several of the most likely candidate applications in healthcare.
John Mattison, MD, Assistant Medical Director, Chief Medical Information Officer, Kaiser Permanente, SCAL

10:25 AM

PANEL DISCUSSION: ACCELERATING CHANGE IN THE HEALTHCARE BLOCKCHAIN ECOSYSTEM

  • Role of collaborative organizations - Use of consortia, working groups, government organizations and standards bodies as accelerant for the education, development, and commercialization of distributed ledger technologies.
  • Standards and regulatory issues
  • ONC Blockchain challenge, including lessons learned and future blockchain initiatives by ONC and HHS
  • Where is the Hyperledger Project going and what is the future of Blockchain-as-a-Service (BaaS)?
  • Impact of intellectual property protections: accelerator or inhibitor?
Moderator:
Leonard Kish, Co-founder & COO, YouBase.io
Panelists:
John Bass, Founder & CEO, Hashed Health
Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director, Hyperledger Project
Debbie Bucci, Office of Standards and Interoperability, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, HHS
Thomas P. Gross, MS, JD, Attorney & Member, Adjunct Faculty, The George Washington University Graduate Business School
Susan Ramonat, Founder & CEO, Spiritus Partners
Merve Unuvar, PhD, Blockchain Product Leader, IBM

11:45 AM

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: A COLLABORATIVE PATH TO DEMOCRATIZE DATA IN HEALTHCARE

Our Healthcare system relies on large centralized entities with walled gardens of valuable information. “Freeing” this data is not solely a technical problem but can be enabled by a decentralized industry utility that incentivizes collaboration and enables stakeholders to treat data as an asset. Collaboration is crucial for success as the landscape shifts from fee for service to value based arrangements. Blockchain technologies can provide the technology foundation to power this dramatic change, but the incentives are key to change the existing behavior and culture. This presentation will discuss some example opportunities and known barriers to set context and then use those as reference while walking through a proposed solution.  
Kyle Culver, Solution Architect, Humana

01:15 PM

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: SOME SIMPLE ECONOMICS OF THE BLOCKCHAIN

The presentation will focus on how blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies will influence innovation, and discuss two key costs that are affected by them: the cost of verification; and the cost of networking. Markets facilitate the voluntary exchange of goods and services between buyers and sellers. For an exchange to be executed, key attributes of a transaction need to be verified by the parties involved at multiple points in time. Blockchain technology, by allowing market participants to perform costless verification, lowers the costs of auditing transaction information, and allows new marketplaces to emerge. Furthermore, when a distributed ledger is combined with a native cryptographic token (as in Bitcoin), marketplaces can be bootstrapped without the need of traditional trusted intermediaries, lowering the cost of networking. This challenges existing revenue models, and opens opportunities for new business models, as well as new identity, provenance and reputation systems. After a brief presentation of the framework, the Q&A will focus on applications in healthcare.
Christian Catalini, PhD, Fred Kayne (1960) Career Development Professor of Entrepreneurship & Assistant Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management, MIT Sloan School of Management

01:45 PM

PANEL DISCUSSION: HEALTHCARE BLOCKCHAIN IOT PLATFORMS

The goal of the panel is to discuss how Blockchain technology can be applied to data exchanged across the Healthcare value chain. The industry is challenged by: regulations and the need to use technology to improve productivity, while moving to value-based outcomes, seeking ways to improve costs – while delivering quality care. Our panel of industry experts will speak on topics ranging from wearables to data marts; to the security of drug supply chain and IoT, all in the context of Blockchain.
Moderator:
Jody Ranck, DrPH, CEO, Krysalis Labs & Executive Vice President of Strategy, Ram Group
Panelists:
Lars Bodenheimer, VP of Technology and Network Engineering, Detecon, Inc.
Doug Bulleit, Managing Partner, DCS Health, LLC
Jim Sabogal, Healthcare Leader, T-Systems North America
Hendrik Speck, Professor of Digital Media, Hochschule Kaiserslautern, CIO & Director of Information Technology, Ram Group & CEO, Ram Communication GmbH

02:30 PM

WHAT CAN HEALTHCARE LEARN FROM FINANCE?

The healthcare industry is under tremendous pressure to contain costs. Intriguingly, a key piece to solve the rising cost puzzle may come from a different industry through a technology that came to prominence to secure Bitcoin transactions: Blockchain. The Finance industry was also faced with the challenge of being one of the least trusted industries. The Finance industry has leveraged Blockchain technology to improve integrity, customer engagement, products and services, purpose and operations. What challenges did financial services tackle to improve trust? How did the finance industry deal with sensitive information and what are the security innovations embedded in the platforms? How did they establish benchmarks and comparative data to change consumer experience? How did they meet simultaneous demands for standardization and personalization? The presentation will provide specific solutions and key practices that can be learned to improve the patient’s relationship to medical providers by increasing transparency, enabling more secure transactions, building permanent and immutable medical records, eliminating the need for third party intermediaries, retroactive authentication and conflict resolution. The full solution to solving the rising healthcare costs will need to incorporate public policy, private innovation and a confluence of complimentary advancements.
Kent Lefner, Partner, Infosys Consulting
Sandeep Savla, Senior Principal, Infosys Consulting

03:30 PM

BUILDING A PATIENT-CENTERED HEALTH IT INFRASTRUCTURE WITH BLOCKCHAIN TECHNOLOGIES

The move from centralized and even cloud storage to peer-to-peer data stores for health care is showing potential for building a truly user-centric health care system. Much like Bitcoin’s blockchain enables exchange of value without a central authority, can blockchain-related technologies be used to enable health information exchange in a peer-to-peer fashion without a central authority, and create universal, yet private, health IDs? This presentation will offer insights on the technology and economics of developing an individual-centric health system.
Leonard Kish, Co-founder & COO, YouBase.io
Ted Tanner, Co-founder & CTO, PokitDok

04:00 PM

PANEL DISCUSSION: BLOCKCHAIN INNOVATION FOR HEALTHCARE SERVICES

Demographic trends will drive changes in the healthcare system. The patient population is growing and growing older. The number of professional providers cannot keep up with the demands of the patient population. Chronic conditions absorb > 75% of healthcare costs, and most patients requiring chronic care have multiple chronic conditions. It follows that to contain costs and improve outcomes, care must move from large facilities to the home and community. The universe of care providers and technologies that support care will expand how we think about patient support systems. The silos of traditional care will break down as coordinated care becomes standard. Payment systems and incentives will change to focus on the whole patient over the expanse of the patient's lifetime. Blockchain will be intimately involved in all of these changes. The experts on this panel will show how the new capabilities for patient identity, data access, validation of health records over time, IoT linkage, and new forms of social connection and engagement will transform healthcare services for patients and for all stakeholders in the healthcare system.
Moderator:
Neil Wasserman, PhD, Managing Partner, Timewave Analytics, LLC & Chief Design Officer, SynchCare, Inc. 
Panelists:
Nick Gogerty, CTO & Co-Founder, Healthcoin
Mike Jacobs, Distinguished Engineer, Optum
Katherine Kuzmeskas, MPH, Founder & CEO, SimplyVital Health
Erik Pupo, Managing Director, North America Clinical & Health Management Services, Accenture

05:00 PM

THE USE OF BLOCKCHAIN TECHNOLOGY TO DEVELOP PATIENT REPORTED OUTCOME MEASURES

Patient-related outcome measures (PROMs), which focus on outcomes that are directly related to the patient, have taken on added importance and significance over the past several years. PROMs can include symptoms and other aspects of health–related quality of life indicators such as physical or social function, and can also facilitate more accurate patient-physician communication in terms of the burden of treatment-related morbidities by providing a more detailed and complete evaluation of treatments for specific conditions. However, the success of a well-developed PROM that adequately and accurately reflects that patient’s perspective relies on the use of an instrument that is psychometrically tested and validated and can capture the burden of disease or treatment, which is time consuming and expensive.  A potential alternative to the use of standardized instruments to collect data and provide a foundation for the development of a PROM is the use of technologies associated with the Internet of Things (IoT), which have rapidly increased as over 80% of all adults use the Internet to search for health information, connect with patients similar to themselves, and share information regarding their condition or the facilities in which they seek treatment. The use of blockchain technology provides an ability to securely protect patient data from all devices, both in transit and at rest, and securely provide access privileges to patients on what type of data they would like to exchange. The use of blockchain technology provides advantages in that it decentralizes data, which increases the security of sensitive information.  A patient can now use their own digital signature and fingerprint, and combine that with a provider’s signature to unlock and release data that will be more secure because of the restricted access that can only be leveraged if there is verification from both the patient and the provider.  This provides greater opportunities in the development of PROMs and the gathering of data to use in such measures.
Jason Goldwater, Senior Director, National Quality Forum

05:30 PM

BLOCKCHAIN FOR PROVIDER DATA MANAGEMENT

Provider data is the foundation of provider directories, and it is referenced and relied upon during the claims adjudication process. For years, the industry has struggled with maintaining accurate and uniform provider data, a result of physicians moving locations, joining new networks, and adjusting care offerings. Blockchains could be used to support a new kind of master data management system for provider data, both internally at a payer, and externally across multiple payers.
Andrew Beal, Blockchain & Distributed Infrastructure, Ernst & Young LLP
Daniel Gietl, Senior Principal, Ernst & Young LLP
Day 2

08:00 AM

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: 21ST CENTURY REGULATIONS

The blending of technology and healthcare is of paramount importance as we move to tackle some of the most devastating issues affecting Americans. Blockchain is the perfect technology to bring about the healthcare revolution our country so desperately needs. Through the use of smart contracts and many other aspects of this technology, we will be able to reduce costs, increase efficiency, and eliminate fraud in our healthcare system.  I look forward to sharing some of my work in this space, and hearing from the numerous experts in the room as to how Congress, and my office specifically, can assist the development of this groundbreaking technology.
David Schweikert [AZ-06], Congressman, U.S. House of Representatives

08:30 AM

PATENT PROTECTION FOR BLOCKCHAIN PATENT APPLICATIONS

If and when you get a patent, what does that mean?  The law says “Whoever invents or discovers any new and useful process,  machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof, may obtain a patent therefor, subject to the conditions and requirements of this title.”  The four statutory categories of invention are “process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter,” but they exclude “laws of nature, natural phenomena, and abstract ideas.”  What does that mean for software and blockchain patent applications?
Christopher Agrawal, Partner, Bookoff McAndrews PLLC
Rama Elluru, Administrative Patent Judge, USPTO Patent Trial and Appeal Board

09:00 AM

PANEL DISCUSSION: BLOCKCHAIN USE CASES IN RARE DISEASE AND SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH (SDOH)

There is much talk of how Blockchain will revolutionize healthcare. This hype must be tempered by the fact that healthcare already has a trust factor built-in, or patients would not take pills prescribed by doctors, or let providers stick needles in their bodies.  It is often said that “Riches are in Niches,” and this is the case for blockchain and areas that are tangential to the direct care of the patient.As referenced in the 2015 ONC Interoperability Roadmap, Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) will need to be connected to the patients’ health status. Physicians currently monitor carboxyhemoglobin as an indicator of a patient’s level of smoking. As part of a smoking cessation program, a smart contract on the clinical Blockchain could identify normal blood carboxyhemoglobin (COhb) as reported by a clinical reference lab from the Laboratory Analyzer Blockchain and execute a request to increase an incentive benefit controlled by a “private / permissioned” USDA Clinical Blockchain. The clinical Blockchain will track the specific “chain of custody” from iStat Analyzer (Accriva, Radiometer, etc…) to the patient test results report, which triggers the smart contract with the USDA to distribute an incentive. Both the physician and the patient are notified of the disbursement. Similar use cases could be implemented for patients with diabetes, and obesity, helping people live healthy lives.
Moderator:
Edward Bukstel, CEO, Clinical Blockchain
Panelists:
Joe Guagliardo, Partner, Pepper Hamilton
Shereese Maynard, Public Health Consultant

09:45 AM

BLOCKCHAIN IDENTITY MANAGEMENT FOR PHARMA AND HEALTHCARE

Blockchain is more than just the technology behind Bitcoin. It’s a powerful tool for helping organizations to manage identities in new ways. At Peer Ledger, we believe the logical evolution identity- and access-management solution is to marry Blockchain with several generations of existing identity management infrastructure. We predict Blockchain applications will be used alongside “off-chain” trust infrastructure, such as PKI. Using SAFE Bio-Pharma-compliant certificates, Peer Ledger Blockchain Identity Translation (BIT) Services map real identities to Blockchain identities. That means that the existing PKI credentials of individuals throughout an organization can be transferred seamlessly to blockchain applications. Our hybrid approach provides a full suite of identity management services, such as multi-factor authentication, delegation, unification, and revocation services for Pharma and Healthcare.
Peter Alterman, PhD, Chief Operating Officer, SAFE-BioPharma Association 
Dawn Jutla, PhD, Chief Executive Officer, Peer Ledger

10:30 AM

BUILDING TRUST AMONG MULTIPLE STAKEHOLDERS IN PRECISION MEDICINE BY BLOCKCHAIN

The practice of precision medicine critically relies on the trust among multiple stakeholders, including but not limited to insurance providers, health systems, clinicians, researchers, patients, sequence labs and federal agencies. Paper-based consents are not easily subject to automatic validation, are not updatable in real time, and can be lost or altered. With increased awareness and regulation of health information privacy, secure access is instrumental to efficient and timely genomic information exchange. We propose to use a blockchain-based, Smart Contract protocol to build a trusted framework for this purpose. Blockchain is a trust machine that can be applied beyond the financial industry. With industry partners, we are expecting to prototype the blockchain-based Smart Contract protocol to maximize the reach and efficacy of clinical genomics and precision medicine.
Simon Lin, MD, MBA, Chief Research Information Officer, Nationwide Children’s Hospital & Professor of Pediatrics and Biomedical Informatics, Ohio State University

10:55 AM

WHAT BLOCKCHAIN IMPLEMENTERS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT COMPLIANCE

Blockchain is widely heralded for its promise in streamlining operations, reducing frictional costs, and opening new markets and new business models.  But blockchain’s transparency, permanency of records, and amenability to real-time data analytics across a broadly distributed network provide greater opportunities for oversight as well as new models for engagement with regulators.  From HIPAA compliance to pharmaceutical supply chain requirements, to patient record requests to payments oversight and compliance, blockchain technology offers the potential for new models of oversight and compliance, as well as better cooperative engagement with regulators.
Alan Cohn, Of Counsel, Steptoe & Johnson LLP and Counsel, Blockchain Alliance

11:20 AM

BLOCKCHAIN APPLICATIONS IN GOVERNMENT

The presenters will discuss the rise of distributed consensus ledgers and the opportunities for, and impact upon, the federal government. How do the major business values presented by this technology intersect with, interact with, and potentially clash with the institutions of government? What opportunities should federal leaders be on the lookout for?
Vishal Kapur, Principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP
Jason Killmeyer, Senior Consultant, Federal Strategy & Operations, Deloitte Consulting LLP

11:45 AM

BLOCKCHAIN FOR THE PHARMACEUTICAL SUPPLY CHAIN – MOVING FROM TALK TO ACTION

The pharmaceutical supply chain is undergoing a worldwide transformation as countries are requiring unit level serialization. The US law requires an "interoperable" system by 2023 - and we believe the answer is blockchain. We would love to review our work on creating a consortium of pharmaceutical supply chain participants: manufacturers, distributors, and dispensers and our progress to date to take the "talk" of blockchain and create a real world solution.
Susanne Somerville, Founder, The LinkLab

12:10 PM

THE BLOCKCHAIN TODAY MAY NOT BE JUST ABOUT TECHNOLOGY. IT’S ALSO ABOUT LEARNING

The concept of a blockchain and its presumed advantages create the potential for a fundamentally different foundational layer below processes like clinical trials and supply chain management. While the blockchain is a novel technological approach that will mature further, today's challenge from a practical business perspective is also about people, already established processes, rules and regulations. A hypothetical case will be made that successful implementation of a blockchain project in a global biopharmaceutical company is a two-step process – and both are critically important: peripheral work on adapting to blockchain, i.e. removing obstacles and creating the environment to implement this new technology, and direct work.
Dany De Grave, Senior Director, Innovation Programs, Sanofi Pasteur

02:00 PM

OPTIONAL POST-SUMMIT WORKSHOP ON BLOCKCHAIN PILOT DESIGN

This workshop is for attendees who want to accelerate the practical implementation of blockchain technologies. The workshop will be led by experts with both business and technical expertise in blockchain applications. Beginning with practical exercises in business design, the workshop will allow participants to explore technical alternatives for pilot implementations.
The workshop will offer presentations on design techniques and issues of particular relevance to the technical application of blockchain infrastructure capabilities. Since blockchain technologies are evolving rapidly, the aim is to give workshop participants the latest information on the state of the art in blockchain. The key component of the workshop, however, will be a series of guided exercises in business design and planning for phased technical implementation of the intended business application.
The workshop participants with come away with:
  • A high-level design for a business application using blockchain technology (use case and concept of operations)
  • A preliminary technical design identifying options for implementation
  • Cost, timing, and resources required for the pilot design and implementation process
  • Needs for managing change in the participant's business organization and user environment (customers, partners, supporting businesses)
  • Understanding of legal and regulatory considerations
  • A plan for monitoring, measurement and assessment of the pilot implementationWe expect that participants will gain usable practical experience with pilot design and understand how to make decisions that will maximize learning from the pilot implementations and accelerate the path toward successful applications of blockchain technology that can scale to enterprise requirements.
Workshop Chairperson:
Neil Wasserman, PhD, Managing Partner, Timewave Analytics, LLC & Chief Design Officer, SynchCare, Inc.
Workshop Instructors:
Edward Bukstel, CEO, Clinical Blockchain
Philip Clothiaux, Director of Membership and Projects, Hashed Health
Kyle Culver, Solution Architect, Humana
Mike Jacobs, Distinguished Engineer, Optum
Susan Ramonat, Founder & CEO, Spiritus Partners